The Walter Camp Coach of the Year

The Walter Camp Coach of the Year is selected by the nation’s 129 Football Bowl Subdivision head coaches and sports information directors.  This prestigious award is bestowed upon an individual who has distinguished himself as a great teacher and role model on and off the field.

Ed Orgeron, head coach of the Louisiana State University Tigers, is the Walter Camp 2019 Coach of the Year.  The Walter Camp Coach of the Year is selected by the nation’s 130 Football Bowl Subdivision head coaches and sports information directors.

Orgeron joins former LSU head coaches Les Miles (2011) and Jerry Stovall (1982) as the Walter Camp Coach of the Year.   In addition, Orgeron is the 11th coach from the Southeastern Conference to earn the honor.

Under Orgeron’s direction this season, the LSU has recorded a 13-0 record, winning the SEC title with a 37-10 victory over No. 4 Georgia on Dec. 8.  This season, the Tigers have defeated five teams who were ranked in the top ten at the time of the game. It is the second time in college football history (Notre Dame, 1943), a team has done that.  Top-ranked LSU will play fourth-ranked Oklahoma in 2019 College Football Playoff Semifinal at the Chuck-fil-A Bowl in Atlanta, Ga. on Saturday, December 28.  

Orgeron was named LSU’s interim coach during the 2016 season.  He went 5-2 to finish the regular season and was promoted to head coach.  His overall record at LSU is 38-9, 23-7 in the SEC.  Prior to arriving at LSU, Orgeron was a head coach at Ole Miss (2005-07) and USC (2013).   His overall coaching record is 54-36.   

A native of Larose, La., Orgeron is a 1984 graduate of Northwestern State University and earned a B.A. in liberal arts.  He and his wife Kelly have three children.

Previous winners of The Walter Camp Coach of the Year Award

2018 – Nick Saban, Alabama

2017 – Mark Richt, Miami

2016 – Mike MacIntyre, Colorado

2015 – Dabo Swinney, Clemson

2014 – Gary Patterson, TCU

2013 – David Cutcliffe, Duke

2012 – Brian Kelly, Notre Dame

2011 – Les Miles, LSU

2010 – Chip Kelly, Oregon

2009 – Gary Patterson, TCU

2008 – Nick Saban, Alabama

2007 – Mark Mangino, Kansas

2006 – Greg Schiano, Rutgers

2005 – Joe Paterno, Penn State

2004 – Tommy Tuberville, Auburn

2003 – Bob Stoops, Oklahoma

2002 – Kirk Ferentz, Iowa

2001 – Ralph Friedgen, Maryland

2000 – Bob Stoops, Oklahoma

1999 – Frank Beamer, Virginia Tech

1998 – Bill Synder, Kansas State

1997 – Lloyd Carr, Michigan

1996 – Bruce Snyder, Arizona State

1995 – Gary Barnett, Northwestern

1994 – Joe Paterno, Penn State

1993 – Terry Bowden, Auburn

1992 – Gene Stallings, Alabama

1991 – Bobby Bowden, Florida State

1990 – Bobby Ross, Georgia Tech

1989 – Bill McCartney, Colorado

1988 – Don Nehlen, West Virginia

1987 – Dick MacPherson, Syracuse

1986 – Jimmy Johnson, Miami

1985 – Fisher DeBerry, Air Force

1984 – Joe Morrison, South Carolina

1983 – Mike White, Illinois

1982 – Jerry Stovall, Louisiana State

1981 – Jackie Sherrill, Pittsburgh

1980 – Vince Dooley, Georgia

1979 – John Mackovic, Wake Forest

1978 – Warren Powers, Missouri

1977 – Lou Holtz, Arkansas

1976 – Frank R. Burns, Rutgers

1975 – Frank Kush, Arizona State

1974 – Barry Switzer, Oklahoma

1973 – Johnny Majors, Pittsburgh

1972 – Joe Paterno, Penn State

1971 – Bob Devaney, Nebraska

1970 – Bob Blackman, Dartmouth

1969 – Bo Schembechler, Michigan

1968 – Woody Hayes, Ohio State

1967 – John Pont, Indiana